March 2015 Briefing - Surgery

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for March 2015. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Expands Approval for 'Valve in Valve' Aortic Replacement

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that use of the CoreValve "valve-in-valve" aortic replacement has been expanded to include people at extreme risk for serious complications from traditional open-heart surgery.

More Information

Small, Steady Decline in Cancer Rates in U.S. Over Past Decade

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- America is making slow but steady progress against cancer, with a continuing decline in cancer deaths, according to a new report published online March 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The report was coauthored by experts from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text

2015 Match Sees High Proportion of Unmatched Seniors

MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About 6.1 percent of U.S. allopathic medical school seniors in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) were not placed into first-year residency positions, with a higher percentage of unmatched seniors than in 2014, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

More Information

Older Patients Can Benefit From Older Donor Kidneys

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients who need a kidney transplant are better off receiving an available organ from an older deceased donor rather than waiting for one from a younger donor, according to a new study published online March 26 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Laparoscopic Tops Abdominal Hysterectomy for Fibroid Tumors

FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation is associated with better outcomes than abdominal hysterectomy for women with presumed fibroid tumors, according to research published online March 24 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text

U/S Strain Imaging Can Quantify, Map Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonographic (US) strain imaging can quantify and map behaviors in the carpal tunnel, according to a study published in the April issue of Radiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physicians Should Be Aware of Signs of Burnout

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout can be prevented if physicians are aware of the warning signs, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

More Information

Binge Eating Linked to Comorbidities in Obese Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For obese adults, binge eating disorder (BED) may be associated with specific medical comorbidities, according to a study published online March 16 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lasting Benefit for Stress Mgmt Post Breast Cancer Surgery

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For women with early-stage breast cancer, cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) delivered after surgery is associated with long-term psychological benefits, according to a study published online March 23 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Approves New Miniature Blood Pump System

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Impella 2.5 System has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to maintain stable heart function and blood circulation during high-risk cardiac operations, the agency said in a news release.

More Information

Rotational Instrument Delivery OK for Fetal Malposition

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal outcomes are no worse with rotational instrumental delivery than with cesarean delivery for persistent fetal malposition, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lasting Pain Relief With Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's

MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Parkinson's disease, subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is associated with lasting improvement in pain, although new pain can develop during follow-up, according to a study published online March 23 in JAMA Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Bariatric Surgery May Help Reduce Asthma Exacerbations

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery cuts the risk of an emergency department visit or hospitalization for asthma exacerbation in obese patients by half, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Electronic Solutions Underway for Rx Prior Authorizations

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts are underway to offer technological solutions to the burdens associated with prior authorizations, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Full Text

Live Donor Transplant Good Option in Acute Liver Failure

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute liver failure (ALF), live donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a valid treatment option with excellent outcomes, according to a study published online March 19 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Outcomes Favorable for HIV+ Kidney Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney transplant patients with HIV have similar survival rates as those without HIV, a new study finds. The findings were published online March 19 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Minority Women Less Involved in Choices for Breast CA Surgery

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Minority patients are less actively involved in surgeon and hospital selection for breast cancer surgery, according to a study published online March 19 in JAMA Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Public Outcomes Reporting Tied to Lower PCI Rates for Acute MI

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Public reporting of outcomes may be tied to lower rates of percutaneous revascularization and higher in-hospital mortality among acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients in reporting states, compared to nonreporting states, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Social Class, Race Biases Don't Impact Surgical Decisions

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Social class and race biases do not appear to affect clinical decision-making among surgical clinicians, according to a study published online March 18 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Than 16 Million Americans Have Gained Coverage Under ACA

TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Obama Administration reported Monday the largest drop in the number of Americans without health insurance since the Johnson administration expanded health coverage through Medicare and Medicaid 50 years ago.

More Information

Gender-Specific Variation in Medical Specialties

MONDAY, March 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical specialties vary by gender, with obstetrics/gynecology and pediatrics dominated by female residents and specialties such as surgery, emergency medicine, and anesthesiology dominated by males, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

AAMC 2015 Report on Residents

HHS Wants to Help Restore Joy of Medicine

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is listening to physicians and wants to address the regulatory burdens they face, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Patients Say Pain Control Is Key to Quality of Care in Hospitals

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Management of pain is an important component in improving the quality of care in hospitals from a patient's perspective, according to research published in the March issue of Pain Practice.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Getting Heard May Be Key to Getting New Job

FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your voice may be the key to landing a new job, researchers report in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

More Information

Damaged Kidneys May Still Be Viable in Transplant

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Kidneys from deceased donors that have acute injuries are frequently discarded, but some injured kidneys might still be suitable for transplant, according to research findings published online March 11 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Clinical Trial Data Often Not Reported in Timely Manner

THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are not promptly reporting the results of clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov, according to an article published in the March 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Restrictive Transfusion Threshold No Better Post Cardiac Surgery

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing nonemergency cardiac surgery, a postoperative restrictive transfusion threshold is not superior to a liberal threshold, according to a study published in the March 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Physicians Should Plan Exit Strategy in Advance

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should begin planning their exit strategy three to five years in advance, according to the American Medical Association.

More Information

Persistent EHR Nonadoption Could Mean Lower Payment

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent nonadopters of electronic health records (EHRs) tend to be older, and are employed in smaller practices, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Frustrated by Regulations, Doctors Increasingly Miserable

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide Physician Misery Index is 3.7 out of 5, with the vast majority of physicians reporting that the business and regulation of health care has worsened the practice of medicine, according to a report published by Geneia.

More Information

Age, Race May Affect Tx Decision Regret in Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age, race, and other factors may influence treatment decisional regret among men with prostate cancer, according to research published online March 3 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Outcomes Vary With Transcatheter Valve Surgery

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Of more than 12,000 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement, nearly one-quarter died within a year, while roughly 4 percent had a stroke, new research reveals. However, almost half who survived past one year weren't re-hospitalized in that time, while less than one-quarter were readmitted once. The research findings were reported in the March 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Labiaplasty Considered Safe, With High Patient Satisfaction

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Labiaplasty is safe, with high satisfaction, although current practices are diverse, according to a review published in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Full Text

AAMC: Significant Shortfall of Physicians Projected for 2025

TUESDAY, March 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The expected shortfall of physicians is projected to reach about 46,000 to 90,000 by 2025, according to a study conducted by IHS Inc. for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

More Information

Abnormalities on MRI Predict Knee Replacement

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Structural joint damage measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can predict knee replacement in the following year, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Anesthesiologists Impact CABG Surgery Outcomes

MONDAY, March 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, the rate of death or major complications varies across anesthesiologists, according to a study published in the March issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Changes Being Made to Med School Applicant Assessment

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In accordance with the changes in graduate medical education to better prepare doctors for a changing health care system, changes are being made to medical school applicant evaluation, according to an article published Feb. 19 by the American Medical Association (AMA).

More Information

Most Cancer Patients Involve Family in Treatment Decisions

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most lung and colorectal cancer patients involve family members in treatment decisions, with substantial variation by race/ethnicity and language, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Atrophy Seen in Gluteus Maximus Post Gluteal Augmentation

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The gluteus maximus muscle presents atrophy after gluteal augmentation surgery with implants, according to a study published in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Full Text

Various Factors Influence Central Cord Syndrome Management

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with central cord syndrome (CCS), patient, surgical, and institutional factors influence surgical management and mortality, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Confidence Gap Between Male and Female Med Students

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Female medical students perform at the same or higher level as men, but they lack confidence compared with men, according to a letter published in the March 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

National Hospital Rating Systems Rarely in Agreement

FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- National hospital rating systems are rarely in agreement, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Launches First App to Identify Drug Shortages

THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A mobile phone application (app) has been released to identify current drug shortages, resolved shortages, or discontinuations of drug products, according to a press release published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Rush University Adds Patient Scores to Doctor Profiles

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Rush University Medical Center's website has started adding the results of patient surveys to individual physician profiles, according to a report published by the medical center.

More Information

Nurse Follow-Up by Phone Cuts Problems Post Orthopedic Sx

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A program of phone follow-up by nurses can reduce problems that discharged patients may experience after undergoing orthopedic surgery, according to research published online Feb. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Wound Leak Critical Complication Post Open Globe Repair

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Postoperative wound leak affects a substantial proportion of eyes following repair of open globe injuries, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Aerobic Fitness Can Predict Post-Op Complications in AAA Repair

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, measures of cardiopulmonary fitness can predict postoperative complications, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Anaesthesia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

STS Releases Outcomes for Congenital Heart Sx Database

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) has released the first publicly accessible report of surgical outcomes from its Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD).

More Information

40% of Transplant Surgeons Report Emotional Exhaustion

WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many transplant surgeons in the United States suffer symptoms of burnout, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sedative Pre-Anesthesia Doesn't Increase Patient Satisfaction

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study questions the need for giving a sedative to surgical patients before anesthesia is administered. The report was published in the March 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Research Measures Perceptions of Physician Compassion

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prefer physicians who convey a more optimistic message, and perceive in them a higher level of compassion, according to a study published online Feb. 26 in JAMA Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Acetaminophen Risks May Be Underestimated

TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen may not be as safe as previously thought, with larger doses and long-term use linked to increased risk of health problems, a new report contends. The findings were published online March 2 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text

Excessive Blood Tests Could Raise Heart Surgery Morbidity

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The high number of blood tests done before and after heart surgery can sometimes lead to excessive blood loss, possibly causing anemia and the need for a blood transfusion, new research suggests. Results of the study were published in the March issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mitral Valve Repair Could Improve Mental Health

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) have less depression and anxiety after they undergo surgical repair, according to research published in the March issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital Design Has Little Effect on Patient Satisfaction

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital design has little effect on patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Earlier Surgery Tied to Greater Benefit in Cervical Radiculopathy

MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with painful degenerative disc disease and radiculopathy, undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery within six months of becoming symptomatic is associated with a greater reduction in arm pain scores, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing