Benazepril Helps Patients with Advanced Renal Disease

Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor conveys substantial benefits to non-diabetic patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor benazepril conveys substantial benefits to non-diabetic patients with advanced renal disease, according to a study in the Jan. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Fan Fan Hou, M.D., Ph.D., of Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China, and colleagues studied 422 people with chronic kidney disease. After eight weeks, 104 patients with serum creatinine levels of 1.5 to 3.0 mg per deciliter (group one) received 20 mg of benazepril a day; 224 patients with serum creatinine levels of 3.1 to 5.0 mg per deciliter (group two) received either 20 mg of benazepril a day or a placebo.

Of 102 patients in group one, 22% experienced a doubling of serum creatinine levels, end-stage renal disease or death, compared with 41% of those on benazepril in group two and 60% of the placebo group, the researchers found.

"Benazepril conferred substantial renal benefits in patients without diabetes who had advanced renal insufficiency," the authors write.

In an editorial, Lee A. Hebert, M.D., of Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus, writes that the study demonstrates that ACE inhibitors can be given in generous doses to patients with advanced renal disease.

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