Obesity and Prostate-Specific Antigen Inversely Related

Obesity may need to be considered when screening men for prostate cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- An inverse relationship between obesity and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels exists even among populations with a low prevalence of obesity, and may need to be taken into account when screening men for prostate cancer, researchers report in the September issue of Urology.

Ryosuke Ando, M.D., of the Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences in Nagoya, Japan, and colleagues used data from 5,246 apparently healthy Japanese men to confirm an inverse relationship between obesity and serum PSA levels previously noted among American men. Men were classified into groups by age, body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage. Comparisons between PSA, BMI and body fat percentage were examined using multivariate analysis.

The median age of participants was 46 years old, and median BMI, body fat percentage and PSA levels were 23.2 kg/m2, 21.5 percent and 0.78 ng/mL, respectively. The investigators found that while the percentage of participants with abnormal PSA values significantly increased with age, no relationship of PSA across the BMI or body fat percentage categories was noted. Mean PSA levels also significantly increased with age and decreased with the BMI and body fat percentage categories.

"Our findings have demonstrated an inverse relationship between obesity and PSA levels even in Japanese men with a low prevalence of obesity, such as was previously reported for American men," the authors write. "Therefore, in prostate cancer screening, obesity, which can affect the accuracy of PSA testing, independent of race and ethnicity, should be taken into account."

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