Dapoxetine Helps Men with Premature Ejaculation

Phase III trials show that it doubles the average time to ejaculation compared to placebo

FRIDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Dapoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor developed specifically for moderate-to-severe premature ejaculation, is a safe and effective treatment for men affected by the condition, according to a study published in the Sept. 9 issue of The Lancet.

Jon L. Pryor, M.D., of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues conducted two phase III trials in which 874 men took 30 milligrams of dapoxetine and 870 men took 60 mg of dapoxetine one to three hours before sexual activity, and 870 men took a placebo.

At baseline, the subjects' average time to ejaculation after vaginal penetration was under one minute. After 12 weeks, the researchers found that average time to ejaculation increased to 3.32 minutes for the 60-mg group, 2.78 minutes for the 30-mg group and 1.75 minutes for the placebo group. In the 30-mg and 60-mg groups, side effects included nausea (8.7 and 20.1 percent, respectively), diarrhea (3.9 and 6.8 percent, respectively), headache (5.9 and 6.8 percent, respectively) and dizziness (3 and 6.2 percent, respectively).

"In view of the distress and interpersonal difficulties generally associated with this condition, availability of an effective treatment, especially for those with the most severe premature ejaculation, might encourage men with premature ejaculation to seek a physician diagnosis, and could provide a substantial benefit for men and their partners," the authors conclude.

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