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American Urological Association's 101st Annual Meeting, May 20-25, 2006

American Urological Association's 101st Annual Meeting

The American Urological Association held its 101st annual meeting May 20-25 in Atlanta. The meeting attracted an estimated 15,000 attendees, according to meeting organizer Janet Skorepa, B.S., the American Urological Association's associate executive director of education and scientific meetings.

"It was an excellent educational experience for our attendees," said Skorepa. "We had many new educational programs, and two sell-out events, including our foundation gala and welcoming reception.

The meeting covered several specialties in the field of urology, from pediatric urology to urologic oncology and male reproduction, Skorepa said. Hot topics ranged from prostate cancer to infertility, incontinence and pediatric urology.

One study presented at the meeting suggested a relationship between red meat consumption and prostate cancer mortality in the United States (Abstract). There was also a study that suggested that men who drink more alcohol may be more sexually active than those who do not. And a third indicated that smoking cessation could significantly relieve erectile dysfunction.

In addition, researchers reported that lemonade could serve as an alternative treatment for kidney stones in some patients.

One of the meeting's real highlights was its international flavor, according to Skorepa. "What was special about this meeting was its international component. Our meeting is over 50 percent international -- it's more of an international meeting -- so we're very unique in that respect."

In fact, several meetings of urologists from other nations took place in conjunction with the annual meeting, either in other languages or in translation. "We hold several international society meetings, such as Spanish urology and French urology," Skorepa explained. "Spanish is the largest with 1,200. French has approximately 300. And the Chinese, Japanese and Italian meetings were new this year. We had 250 Chinese urologists this year for the first time."

"Each year, we add more and more international societies wanting to participate in our meeting. Some are held in English, some are translated and some aren't. That is the unique characteristic of our meeting," Skorepa added. "We have embraced the international societies and they are now participating. We believe providing such a meeting for urologists worldwide is the right way to go as our world becomes more interconnected and our international attendance is becoming so high."

Founded in 1902, the AUA has about 15,000 members in the United States and across the world, according to Skorepa.

Bariatric Surgery for Obese May Not Up Kidney Stone Risk

FRIDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients who undergo bariatric surgery excrete more urinary oxalate than patients who do not, but may not run a higher risk of kidney stones because they also excrete less urinary calcium, according to research presented during the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract

Tamsulosin Helps Patients Pass Large Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Tamsulosin improves the stone-free rate in patients who have undergone ureteroscopic lithotripsy for treatment of large renal and ureteric calculi, according to the results of a prospective randomized study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract

Lemonade May Be Alternative Treatment for Kidney Stones

WEDNESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Lemonade may be a viable alternative treatment for kidney stones in patients who cannot tolerate potassium citrate, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract-Preminger
Abstract-Penniston

Erectile Dysfunction Drug Could Proceed to Clinical Trials

WEDNESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new long-acting phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, known as SLx-2101, is safe and well-tolerated, according to the results of a small study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract

Artificial Penis Could Help with Erectile Dysfunction

TUESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Rabbits that receive a transplanted bioengineered penis can successfully mate and produce offspring, suggesting that the treatment could eventually help men with erectile problems caused by corporal fibrosis, researchers reported during the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract

Men Who Drink Have Fewer Urinary Tract Symptoms

MONDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to conventional wisdom, men with benign prostatic hyperplasia who drink alcohol have fewer prostate symptoms and are more sexually active than those who do not, according to research presented during the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract

Erectile Dysfunction May Subside If Smokers Quit

MONDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile dysfunction may reverse in male smokers who quit, according to research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

Abstract

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