Dec. 2005 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for December 2005. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

More STD Patients' Partners Treated in Nurse-Run Program

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A nurse-run program to increase notification of sexual partners of patients with chlamydia can be as successful and cost-effective as referring patients to a specialized clinic, and can also be conducted in a primary-care setting, according to a report published Dec. 15 by the British Medical Journal.

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Coma Outcomes on Soap Operas Too Good to Be True

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Coma patients in soap operas experience significantly rosier outcomes than their real-life counterparts, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Potential Prostate Cancer Biomarker in Healthy Tissue

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A particular DNA phenotype found in prostate tumors, healthy tissue near tumors and in the prostate glands of some healthy older men -- but not healthy younger men -- could serve as an early biomarker for men at risk of prostate cancer, according to a study published Dec. 16 in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Sorry, Celebrants: Hangover Cures Don't Work

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that there is no conventional or complementary intervention that will prevent or treat a hangover, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Short Drinks May Have More Kick Than Tall Ones

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of human perceptual bias, alcoholic beverages mixed in short, wide tumblers may be more potent than those mixed in taller and more slender highball glasses, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

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Hospital 'Handoffs' Common Source of Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Poor communication during hospital "handoffs," when patient care transitions from one physician or team of physicians to the next, may be responsible for many of the estimated 44,000 to 98,000 deaths that occur each year in U.S. hospitals due to medical errors, according to a study published in the December issue of Academic Medicine.

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Radiotherapy After Breast Surgery Improves Outcomes

FRIDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy after lumpectomy and mastectomy have significantly improved long-term survival, according to a study published in the Dec. 17 issue of The Lancet.

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FDA Issues Recall on Meridian Hemodialysis Unit

THURSDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a Class I Recall Wednesday for the Meridian Hemodialysis Instrument (product codes 5M5576 and 5M5576R), a classification that does not require that the instrument be returned. One death and at least one serious injury has been connected with the kinking of blood tubing when it is routed through both channels of the clips mounted on the front of the machine, according to the federal agency.

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Muscle Mass Affects Urinary Albumin/Creatinine Ratio

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A high albumin/creatinine ratio in patients with a low muscle mass can be an indication of low urinary creatinine rather than microalbuminuria and by association, cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in Hypertension.

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Demographics, Lifestyle May Affect Prostate Cancer Test

MONDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Age, race, weight change, energy intake and the use of calcium supplements are all associated with significant differences in the rate of change in prostate specific antigen (PSA) over time, or PSA velocity, and may bias the clinical interpretation of this prostate cancer test, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of Cancer.

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Testicular Torsion Increases Risk of Orchiectomy

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Because testicular torsion is more common than testicular cancer in males aged 1 to 25 years and increases the risk of orchiectomy, boys should be educated from an early age about testicular torsion, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Vaginal Delivery Not Linked to Urinary Incontinence

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Vaginal delivery does not appear to be associated with postmenopausal urinary incontinence, researchers report in the December issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Rather, an inherited susceptibility to the condition may play a greater role, the study authors suggest.

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High Dairy Intake Associated With Prostate Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A high intake of dairy products and calcium is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, according to a report in the Dec. 7 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Plasma Exchange Role Uncertain in Multiple Myeloma

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Numerous plasma exchanges do not substantially change the outcome for patients with acute renal failure at the onset of multiple myeloma, according to a study published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Febuxostat More Effective Than Allopurinol for Gout

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Febuxostat is more effective than allopurinol in the treatment of gout, researchers report in the Dec. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bed-Wetting Associated with Developmental Delays

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Bed-wetting in young children may indicate a delay in the development of their central nervous system, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Percentage Increase in U.K. Men Who Say They Pay for Sex

MONDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of British men who say they've paid women for sex doubled between 1990 and 2000, according to a study published in the December issue of Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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