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December 2007 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for December 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Growth Hormone Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Dec. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A mutation leading to lack of growth hormone reduced incidence of cancer and resulted in less invasive tumors in an animal model of aggressive prostate cancer, according to a report published online Dec. 13 in Endocrinology.

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Toremifene May Protect Bones During Cancer Treatment

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Toremifene, a second-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator, increased bone mineral density in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, suggesting that the drug may decrease fracture risk in this population, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Obesity May Hinder Access to Kidney Transplantation

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who need a kidney transplant, obesity is associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving one, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Percent Free PSA Questioned for Cancer Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Using percent free prostate specific antigen (PSA) added no benefit in diagnosing prostate cancer compared to using total PSA, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Study Questions Epirubicin After Tumor Resection

THURSDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a single instillation of epirubicin after transurethral bladder tumor resection may only prevent small recurrences that could easily be fulgurated with local anesthesia, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Urology.

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PSA, Alkaline Phosphatase Predict Prostate Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For men with metastatic prostate cancer undergoing hormone treatment, measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at the start of treatment and measurement of ALP and prostate specific antigen (PSA) after 6 months, are better predictors of survival than baseline PSA, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Urology.

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COL4A1 Mutations Implicated in Proposed New Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the COL4A1 gene may be the cause of a proposed new syndrome: hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps (HANAC), according to research published in the Dec. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Urinary Incontinence Is Costly for Female Patients

MONDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In community-dwelling women, urinary incontinence is associated with significant annual out-of-pocket costs, according to the results of a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Combo Therapy Beneficial in Metastatic Kidney Cancer

FRIDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, first-line treatment with a combination of the humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab and interferon α-2a leads to a significant improvement in progression-free survival compared to treatment with interferon α-2a alone, according to study findings published in the Dec. 22/29 issue of The Lancet.

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Hospital Surgeries for Female Fecal Incontinence Stable

FRIDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The number of women undergoing in-hospital surgical treatments for fecal incontinence remained stable between 1998 and 2003, but total charges for the procedures rose substantially, researchers report in the December issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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Gleason Grade Linked to Signal Intensity Ratio on MRI

THURSDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- MRI may offer a non-invasive method for helping evaluate the aggressiveness of prostate cancer, according to research published in the January issue of Radiology.

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Bacteria May Form 'Communities' in Bladder Cells

THURSDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Bladder infections in some women may follow a pathway recently demonstrated in mice, with bacteria invading epithelial cells and forming intracellular bacterial communities that could serve as reservoirs for recurrent infections, according to research published online Dec. 18 in PLoS Medicine.

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Virtual Visits As Good As Traditional Rounds

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Robotic telerounds deliver the same standard of care and patient satisfaction as traditional rounds after urologic surgery, according to study findings published in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Dramatically Increases

MONDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1995, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing rates have significantly increased -- especially among black men and younger men -- despite a lack of evidence showing that such tests lead to reductions in prostate cancer-related mortality, according to a study published in the Dec.10/24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Semen Protein Enhances HIV Infection

MONDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- An abundant protein found in human semen dramatically enhances HIV infection by forming fibrils that promote the capture and attachment of HIV virions to target cells, according to study findings published in the Dec. 14 issue of Cell.

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Wearable Kidney Safe and Effective

FRIDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A wearable artificial kidney appears to be largely safe and effective in patients with end-stage kidney failure, according to study findings published in the Dec. 15 issue of The Lancet.

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Cancer Drug Linked to Cardiac Toxicity

FRIDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Sunitinib can lead to cardiac toxicity, such as heart failure, hypertension and reductions in left ventricular ejection fraction, when used to treat cancer patients, researchers report in the Dec. 15 issue of The Lancet.

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Genetic Variant Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic variant of a putative prostate tumor suppressor gene is associated with aggressive prostate cancer, according to research published in the Dec. 19 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Medical Indications for Male Circumcision Sparse

FRIDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- One in six of the world's males are circumcised, predominantly for religious or cultural rather than medical reasons, according to a review published in the Dec. 8 issue of BMJ.

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