January 2008 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for January 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

No Link Between Hormones and Prostate Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A pooled analysis of 18 studies has failed to show a link between sex hormones such as testosterone and the risk of developing prostate cancer, according to a report published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Muscle-Building Supplement Linked to Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A testosterone-containing dietary supplement intended to improve muscle mass has been linked to two cases of aggressive metastatic prostate cancer, and its manufacturers have withdrawn the drug from the market at the request of the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, according to a paper in the Jan. 15 Clinical Cancer Research.

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Papers Detail Graft Success Without Immunosuppression

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Three papers in the Jan. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine discuss scenarios in which five recipients of kidney transplants and one recipient of a liver transplant were able to maintain good function of their new organs without long-term use of immunosuppressant treatment.

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Combined Therapy Can Improve Prostate Cancer Outcome

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Men with localized but unfavorable-risk prostate cancer and minimal comorbidity have better odds of survival if they are treated with a combination of androgen suppression therapy and radiation versus radiation alone, according to the results of a study published in the Jan. 23 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Sorafenib Has Significant Hypertension Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with renal cell carcinoma or other solid tumors treated with sorafenib have an increased risk of hypertension and should be monitored for cardiovascular complications, according to a report published online Jan. 22 in The Lancet.

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FDA Approves New Thrombin Clotting Solution

FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced this week that it has approved a clotting solution made using recombinant DNA techniques, called Recothrom, to help stop bleeding of small blood vessels during surgery. In addition, the FDA has expanded the indication of Evicel, a liquid fibrin sealant previously approved for liver and vascular surgeries, to include use during general surgery.

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SNPs, Family History Raise Prostate Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Carrying multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer, along with a family history of the disease, creates a cumulative risk of prostate cancer in men, according to research published in the Jan. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Multidrug-Resistant MRSA Clone Found in Male Homosexuals

TUESDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with a multidrug-resistant clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is becoming an important source of disease among men who have sex with men in San Francisco and Boston, according to research published online Jan. 15 in advance of publication in the Feb. 19 print issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Low Testosterone Linked to Increased Risk of Fractures

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced testosterone levels are associated with increased risk of bone fracture in older men, according to a report in the Jan. 14 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Potential Male Contraceptive Agent Studied in Rats

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A potential non-hormonal male contraceptive, l-CDB-4022, appears to block fertility in rats by affecting multiple pathways in the testes, and leading to germ cell loss, according to research published in Endocrinology in January.

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Birth Defects Still Affect 3 Percent of U.S. Babies

MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The Jan. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report marks January as National Birth Defects Prevention Month with a series of papers on prevalence and prevention.

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Imaging Shows Risk of Cardiac Events in Dialysis Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography using a radioactive tracer of myocardial fatty acid metabolism can identify those at high risk of cardiac events among asymptomatic hemodialysis patients, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Lower Prostate Cancer Risk in Childless Men

TUESDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Childless men have a moderately lower risk of developing prostate cancer compared with fathers, but among fathers, having more children is linked to a lower prostate cancer risk, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 7 in advance of publication in the journal Cancer.

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Risk of Testicular Cancer for Immigrants Explored

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Immigrants to Denmark have rates of testicular cancer similar to that of their countries of origin, while their Danish-born children have rates similar to that of native-born Danes, researchers report in the Jan. 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Bladder Cancer Induced by Radiation May Be Deadlier

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who develop bladder cancer following a history of radiation for prostate cancer may have a worse prognosis than those who did not receive pelvic radiation, according to an article published in the Journal of Urology in January.

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Combo Therapy Beneficial in Advanced Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In men with locally advanced prostate cancer, the addition of four months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to external-beam radiotherapy may significantly improve long-term outcomes, according to a report published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mild Hypothermia During Surgery Increases Blood Loss

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients whose body temperature during surgery drops even one degree less than normal experience more perioperative bleeding and are more likely to require blood transfusions than those whose body temperature stays in the normal range, researchers report in the January issue of Anesthesiology. Thus, maintaining normothermia during surgery should be a key priority.

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Conservative Approach to Bladder Cancer Debated

FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Conservative management of low-risk superficial bladder tumors may be an appropriate treatment strategy in some older individuals and those with co-morbid conditions who wish to avoid the risks of repeated transurethral tumor resections, provided that these patients undergo careful surveillance for tumor progression, according to an article published in the Journal of Urology in January.

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Retroperitoneal Resistant Staph Infections Described

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Retroperitoneal infections caused by community-associated, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) appear to have a favorable prognosis when diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion with antibiotics and appropriate drainage, according to an article published in the January issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Drugs Show Promise in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Sunitinib and sorafenib, two novel therapeutic agents that target blood vessel growth in tumors, appear to show antitumor activity in patients with metastatic renal carcinoma who have failed prior antiangiogenic therapy, suggesting that sequential inhibition of the angiogenic pathway may be a feasible treatment strategy, according to an article published in The Journal of Urology in January.

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