January 2009 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Anticholinergic Agents Linked to Cognitive Impairment

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cumulative long-term use of anticholinergic medications can lead to cognitive impairment, including poor memory and executive function, according to study findings published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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US Outpatient Surgeries Increasingly Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient surgery visits are rising in the United States, with the number increasing from 20.8 million in 1996 to 34.7 million in 2006. They now account for nearly two-thirds of all surgery visits compared to about half of all surgery visits in 1996, according to a report issued Jan. 28 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Biomarker Predicts Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A marker of acute kidney injury is a strong and independent predictor of disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease, according to research published online Jan. 28 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Measles Virus May Lead to New Prostate Cancer Treatment

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A measles virus strain engineered to express the human carcinoembryonic antigen shows promise in the treatment of prostate cancer, according to research published in the January issue of The Prostate.

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Bisphenol A Levels Do Not Decrease with Fasting

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and polyvinyl chloride plastic, may accumulate in body tissue or be ingested via substantial non-food sources, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Weight Loss Reduces Urinary Incontinence in Obese Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence, a six-month weight-loss program significantly reduces the frequency of self-reported incontinence episodes, researchers report in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Secondhand Smoke Leads to Erectile Dysfunction in Mice

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke reduces erectile function in mice, but the effects can be reversed by treatment with sildenafil, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Nomograms May Help Predict Kidney Transplant Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A set of nomograms may be helpful in predicting renal function and graft survival in living donor kidney transplantation, according to research published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Urology.

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Prostate Cancer May Be Underdiagnosed in Poor Men

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although the detection of low-risk prostate cancers has been increasing in the United States due to screening, this is not the case among low-income, disadvantaged men, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Thalidomide May Be Helpful in Recurrent Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Thalidomide may help delay prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression in some men with prostate cancer, according to research released online Jan. 23 in advance of publication in the March issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Adjuvant Radiation Shows Benefit After Prostate Surgery

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adjuvant radiotherapy shortly after radical prostatectomy in men with extraprostatic prostate cancer is associated with improved survival, according to research released online Jan. 22 in advance of publication in the March issue of the Journal of Urology.

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'Haufen' Might Help Diagnose Viral Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Three-dimensional aggregates of polyomavirus in urine -- dubbed Haufen -- may be reliable markers of BK polyomavirus nephropathy (BKN), which occurs in up to 9 percent of renal allografts, according to research published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Survey Respondents Frown on UK's Plans for Flomax

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Most readers surveyed by the journal Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin are not in favor of the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency's plans to possibly make trimethoprim and tamsulosin (Flomax) available over the counter, according to findings released Jan. 14.

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Supplement May Play Different Roles in Prostate Scenarios

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In the healthy prostate, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may be benign, but in the presence of reactive stroma and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), it may promote more androgenic effects, according to research published online Jan. 13 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Family History Doesn't Affect Prostate Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In men with clinically localized prostate cancer, treatment outcomes are similar between those with a family history of the disease and those with sporadic disease, according to study findings published in the January issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics.

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Selenium Decreases Bladder Cancer Risk in Some Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although selenium has no overall association with bladder cancer, high concentrations may decrease the risk in women and moderate smokers and increase the risk in heavy smokers, according to a report in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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