May 2006 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for May 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Trimming Red Meat from Diet May Help Type 2 Diabetics

TUESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting red meat out of the diet of type 2 diabetics with macroalbuminuria reduces their urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) and boosts their polyunsaturated fatty acid levels, researchers report in the May issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Ethnicity Tied to Quality of Life After Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are black or Hispanic have a lower quality of life after prostate cancer treatment than whites, but medical comorbidities, physical activity and sleep problems explain much of the difference, according to the results of a study published in the May issue of Urology.

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Study Finds No Link Between Viagra, Optic Neuropathy

WEDNESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who use sildenafil (Viagra) are no more likely than patients in the general population to develop nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, according to Pfizer-conducted research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Atlanta.

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Radical Prostatectomy Effective in Younger Men

FRIDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Radical prostatectomy affords cancer control in men under the age of 50, a finding that is important because young men are being diagnosed with prostate cancer in larger numbers due to serum prostate-specific antigen testing, according to a study published in the May issue of Urology.

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Amyloidosis of Urinary Tract Can Mimic Malignancy

FRIDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Localized amyloidosis of the urinary tract is rare and often mimics malignancy, according to a report in the May issue of Urology.

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Erectile Dysfunction Associated with Sleep Apnea

THURSDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Men with sleep apnea syndrome are also likely to have erectile dysfunction, according to a study published in the May issue of Urology.

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Overactive Bladder Differs in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

THURSDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The urodynamics of bladder dysfunction differ in patients with multiple sclerosis compared with patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity, according to a report in the May issue of Urology. Women with multiple sclerosis have overactive bladder contractions of a greater amplitude than other patients, which has a high predictive value in identifying multiple sclerosis, the authors say.

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Kidney Enlargement from Cysts Can Be Measured Reliably

WEDNESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney enlargement caused by the growing cysts in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is measurable and predictable, and is associated with a decline in renal function, according to a study in the May 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Three Questions Can Identify Type of Incontinence

WEDNESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Three simple questions can enable primary care practitioners to distinguish between urge and stress incontinence in women, obviating the need for extensive evaluation, according to a study published in the May 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Viagra May Alleviate Priapism in Sickle Cell, Other Patients

WEDNESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term treatment with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil (Viagra) or other drugs may help alleviate recurrent priapism due to sickle cell disease or unknown causes, according to a report in the May issue of Urology.

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Microalbuminuria Associated with Insulin Resistance

THURSDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, declines in the glucose disposal rate increase the risk of developing microalbuminuria, according to a study in the May issue of Diabetes.

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Frivolous Claims Account for Small Fraction of Costs

WEDNESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of resources involved in malpractice claims go toward resolving and paying those that involve errors, indicating it may be more cost-effective to streamline claims processing rather than discourage claims, according to a study in the May 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Radiation Effective for Younger Men with Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are 55 years of age or younger with localized prostate cancer experience outcomes as good as older men when treated with external beam radiation, according to a study published online May 8 in Cancer.

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Urology Outcomes Better in High-Volume Hospitals

FRIDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital-specific surgical outcomes for urologic cancer are related to the volume of urologic-specific procedures performed at the institution and not to their status as a specialized hospital or to how often they perform other procedures, according to a report in the May 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Aggressive Prostate Cancer Therapy Affects Quality of Life

TUESDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Aggressive treatment for older men with localized prostate cancer minimally reduces the absolute risk of dying, but is linked to significant decreases in health-related quality of life (HRQOL), according to a study in the May issue of the American Journal of Medicine.

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Physician’s Briefing Staff

Physician’s Briefing Staff

Updated on June 01, 2006

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