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October 2006 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for October 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Gene Deletion Doubles Prostate Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Men who have a large deletion in a gene involved in the response to DNA damage have nearly double the risk of developing prostate cancer as men who do not, according to a report published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Medical Genetics.

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Most Older Men Report Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

TUESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Most older men report lower urinary tract symptoms, and more than half of those with severe symptoms feel "terrible" about them, according to a report published in the October issue of Urology.

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Partial Nephrectomy for Cancer May Reveal Benign Lesion

TUESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Despite expert radiologic interpretation, about 16 percent of small, solitary renal masses thought to be renal cancer and treated with partial nephrectomy turn out to be benign. Parenchyma-sparing methods should be performed in patients with suspected renal cell carcinoma to prevent undue morbidity, according to a study in the October issue of Urology.

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Twenty-Minute Incontinence Test Better Than Longer Test

TUESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty-minute pad tests may be even more sensitive than the standard one-hour pad tests for women with stress urinary incontinence, according to a report in the October issue of Urology.

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Renal Cancer Less Aggressive in Obese Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Although a greater body mass index, or BMI, is associated with a higher risk of developing renal cell carcinoma, it is also linked to less-aggressive disease and longer five-year survival in patients who do develop the cancer, researchers report in the October issue of Urology.

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Prostate Cancer Patients Often Not Told of Fertility Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Although prostate cancer patients are informed about the incontinence and impotence implications of treatments, most doctors fail to address the risks to future fertility, according to a report published in the October issue of Urology.

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Testosterone Levels Affect Men's Risk of Falling

MONDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Older men with low testosterone levels have an increased risk of falling, according to study findings reported in the Oct. 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Bread Intake Linked to Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma

MONDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A diet with a high bread intake is associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma, while consuming high amounts of both raw and cooked vegetables is associated with a lower risk, according to the results of a large case-control study published online Oct. 20 in the International Journal of Cancer.

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Increased Mortality Seen in Older Diabetics

FRIDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to older non-diabetic adults, older diabetics have a significantly increased risk of death, including a twofold higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, even when their diabetes is treated, according to a study published in the October issue of the open-access journal PLoS-Medicine.

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Sexually Transmitted Disease Re-Infection Risk Is High

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with sexually transmitted infections are at high risk of being re-infected after treatment and should be re-screened after three months, according to study findings published Oct. 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Men with Regular Care More Apt to Discuss PSA Test

THURSDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Older men with a usual source of health care and blacks are more likely to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen test with their doctor, according to a report in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Obesity Affects Levels of Prostate-Specific Antigen

TUESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Obese men have lower baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels than thinner men, suggesting that physicians should be wary of slight PSA increases in this group of patients, according to a report published online Oct. 9 in Cancer.

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Four Care Standards Prolong Hemodialysis Patients' Lives

FRIDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hemodialysis patients treated according to four quality standards for the care of patients with end-stage renal disease are less likely to die or go to the hospital than those whose care reaches no such standards, researchers report in the Oct. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Agents Search Calif. Spinach Farms in E. coli Outbreak

FRIDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration as well as other federal and California authorities continue to investigate causes of the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak associated with fresh spinach. On Oct. 4, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California announced the execution of search warrants on Growers Express in Salinas, and Natural Selection Foods LLC in San Juan Bautista, to investigate allegations of insufficient safety precautions before shipping spinach out-of-state.

More Information -- FDA
More Information -- U.S. Department of Justice

Male Mice with Mutant Mitochondria Are Infertile

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Male mice containing high levels of mutant mitochondria are infertile due to lower sperm numbers and reduced sperm motility, according to a report released online ahead of publication in the Oct. 10 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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One in 10 U.K. Men Surveyed Pay for Sex

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- One in 10 men pay for sex, almost half of whom have a partner, according to the results of a study published in the October issue of Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Prostate Cancer Patients Prefer Less Aggressive Therapy

TUESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Most men treated for localized prostate cancer choose less aggressive radiation therapy over high-dose treatment, preferring higher quality of life over improved survival, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Modulated Radiation Safe and Effective for Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of men with prostate cancer who are treated with high-dose, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) remain disease-free eight years later, according to a report in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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