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September 2016 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for September 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC: Too Many Health Care Workers Not Getting Flu Vaccine

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly one in every five American health care workers do not receive the annual influenza vaccination, and in some facilities that number exceeds half, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Meditation Recommended for Helping Attendings 'Attend'

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Meditation can allow attending physicians to be "in attendance" in order to heal and maintain personal well-being, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

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Capping Copays Will Raise Premiums, Up Drug Prices

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The proposed capping of copays will raise premiums and is likely to increase drug prices, according to a report from the National Center for Policy Analysis (NCPA).

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Constitutional Symptoms Often Trigger Antibiotic Rx in Elderly

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Constitutional symptoms, including mentation, often lead to diagnostic testing and potentially inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in older patients suspected of having a urinary tract infection (UTI) or pneumonia, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Considerable Number of Doctors Attend Patient Funerals

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of doctors attend patient funerals, including 71 percent of general practitioners (GPs), according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Death Studies.

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Many Doctors Reluctant to Reveal Mental Health Issues

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Wary of the stigma of a mental health diagnosis and its toll on their careers, physicians often avoid getting help for depression and other mental illnesses, according to a report published online Sept. 15 in General Hospital Psychiatry.

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AMA: Practicing Empathy May Lead to More Joy in Medicine

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Empathetic listening can help physicians navigate difficult situations and forge deeper connections with patients, leading to greater professional satisfaction and joy, according to the American Medical Association.

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NIH: More Must Be Done to Fight Antimicrobial Resistance

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) remains a major public health threat, and only a multipronged attack can address the problem, according to a report published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Art Therapy, Clown Visits Cut Children's Preoperative Anxiety

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An intervention based on art therapy and clown visits can reduce children's anxiety at preoperative separation from parents, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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No Link Found Between Vasectomy, Prostate Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There is no connection between vasectomy and overall risk of prostate cancer or prostate cancer mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hospitals Increasingly Employing Doctors, Effects on Care Uncertain

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals are increasingly switching to an employment relationship with physicians, but switching has had no impact on primary composite quality metrics, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Drop in Use of Digital Rectal Examination, PSA Testing

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Following U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations against routine prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been a decrease in utilization of digital rectal examination and PSA testing, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Average Premiums for Health Care Coverage Stable in 2016

MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The average annual premiums for single and family coverage remained stable in 2016, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Health Affairs.

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Tension-Free Vaginal Tape-Obturator Has Lasting Benefit

FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The tension-free vaginal tape-obturator procedure is usually still effective at 10 years after the procedure, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Testosterone Seems Safe for Hypogonadal Prostate CA Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For hypogonadal men with prostate cancer, testosterone treatment seems oncologically safe, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Recommendations Developed for Cost-Effectiveness Analyses

THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new set of recommendations has been developed for conduct and reporting of cost-effectiveness analyses, according to a report published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Outlook Good for Localized Prostate CA, Despite Tx Chosen

THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality rates from localized prostate cancer are roughly the same over several years regardless of choosing watchful waiting or undergoing radiation or prostatectomy, according to research published online Sept. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Value-Driven Outcomes Tool Can Cut Health Care Costs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A multifaceted value-driven outcomes tool that identifies variability in costs and outcomes can reduce health care costs, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Potential Mechanism ID'd for Impact of Parity on Pelvic Floor

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parity is associated with increased fiber length in the more proximal coccygeus and iliococcygeus pelvic floor muscles, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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New Anticancer Drugs Up Costs and Life Expectancy Considerably

TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New anticancer drugs, which increase costs considerably, are associated with large gains in life expectancy, according to research published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Lean Processes Can Cut Wait Times at VA Hospitals

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients at Veterans Affairs hospitals, implementation of lean practices can reduce wait times and increase operative volume, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

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PSA Failure Predicts Death in Men With No, Minimal Comorbidity

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer with no or minimal comorbidity, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Risk of Injuries Up Around Period of Cancer Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cancer have increased risks of iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic injuries shortly before and after cancer diagnosis, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in The BMJ.

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Physician's Briefing
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