Health Tip: Fuel Your Child With a Good Breakfast

What to include and exclude

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(HealthDay News) -- Many experts say breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

Your child's breakfast should include a healthy balance of fruits and vegetables, proteins, grains and dairy.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers these suggestions for a good breakfast:

  • If you have a picky eater, a few rolled up pieces of ham and cheese are a more nutritious option than waffles covered in sugary syrup.
  • Offer foods that your child enjoys. Include a spread of peanut butter or almond butter for an excellent protein source.
  • If your child loves sugary cereals, mix the sugary offering with a more nutritious option. The youngster may not even notice.
  • If your child has been going through a growth spurt or has been particularly active, the child may require more calories, notably at breakfast.
  • Offer healthy choices, even when everyone's on the run Always include fresh fruit, a bag of trail mix or a batch of smoothies.
  • Always read nutritional labels. Opt for unprocessed foods as often as possible.

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